Subsequently, the “Lausanne II Conference”, whose work lasted three months, led to the signing of the “Treaty of Lausanne”, an international peace agreement, on July 24, 1923 at the “Beau Rivage Plus” hotel in Lausanne, southern Switzerland, the victorious powers after the First World War (including Great Britain, France and Italy) and the Ottoman Empire, who chaired his delegation to the conference, Ismet Inonu, and on the basis of which the Ottoman Empire was formally divided, and the Turkish Republic was founded under the presidency of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. In return, Turkey renounced all claims to former Turkish territories outside its new borders and pledged to guarantee the rights of its minorities. A separate agreement between Greece and Turkey provided for the compulsory exchange of minorities. One can therefore understand some aspects of the ongoing dispute between Turkey and the West. It is possible to strike a balance between the Lausanne II Treaties and the “Treaty of Nanking” that China addressed to Britain after the First Opium War by signing the Chenba Agreement, which was to end the First Anglo-Chinese Conflict. • It included 143 articles spread over 17 documents between the “Agreement”, the “Charter”, the “Declaration” and the “Annex” and dealt with conciliation agreements between the contracting parties, the signatories to the treaty and the resumption of diplomatic relations between them, “in accordance with the general principles of international law”. In 1839, Britain invaded China to break opposition to its participation in the country`s economic and political affairs, and one of the main objectives of the British War was the occupation of Hong Kong Island, populated on the coasts of southeastern China. The new British colony (Hong Kong Island) prospered by becoming a trading center between East and West and the commercial gateway and distribution center for southern China, and in 1898, Britain secured an additional 99 years of rule over Hong Kong under the Second Beijing Convention. . .

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